Giving kids a home

indira

Indira is a social activist who founded the Prisoners Assistance Nepal organisation in 2000. She aims to rescue and educate children whose parents have been put in jail; many of which are cramped for space and dirty. As no one else is able to take care of them, they are rescued and put in a children’s home where they receive schooling, gain agricultural skills and remain safe. Since her organisation began, she has assisted 1600 children gain access to a better life with 500 currently in her care. Indira herself was born into extreme poverty and was not given education at first unlike her brother though she yearned for it. Instead she learned by watching him do homework and wrote on the ground and taught herself as she did not have any books to write on. She believes that all children have a light inside of them and her work is motivated by the vision to ‘find that light in every child!’.

Ms Ranamagar also lobbies the Nepalese government and authorities to make prisons more humane, especially as children under 5 years old are likely to remain with their parents. Prisoners Assistance also educates the mothers in prison up until a grade 5 level and vocational training to enter into the workplace and supports those who have been released. In 2014, she was honoured with the World’s Children’s Prize and in 2017 she has been recognised as one of BBC’s 100 most influential and inspirational women around the world.

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Giving kids a home

indira

Indira is a social activist who founded the Prisoners Assistance Nepal organisation in 2000. She aims to rescue and educate children whose parents have been put in jail; many of which are cramped for space and dirty. As no one else is able to take care of them, they are rescued and put in a children’s home where they receive schooling, gain agricultural skills and remain safe. Since her organisation began, she has assisted 1600 children gain access to a better life with 500 currently in her care. Indira herself was born into extreme poverty and was not given education at first unlike her brother though she yearned for it. Instead she learned by watching him do homework and wrote on the ground and taught herself as she did not have any books to write on. She believes that all children have a light inside of them and her work is motivated by the vision to ‘find that light in every child!’.

Ms Ranamagar also lobbies the Nepalese government and authorities to make prisons more humane, especially as children under 5 years old are likely to remain with their parents. Prisoners Assistance also educates the mothers in prison up until a grade 5 level and vocational training to enter into the workplace and supports those who have been released. In 2014, she was honoured with the World’s Children’s Prize and in 2017 she has been recognised as one of BBC’s 100 most influential and inspirational women around the world.

Send a Comment

Your email address will not be published.